SHC Blog-small-min

How to Acquire a Multi-State Nursing License

With all of the legislative changes surrounding the eNLC thus far in 2018, we want to make sure to provide nursing professionals with the latest information as it becomes available.  According to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN), th
Share

With all of the legislative changes surrounding the eNLC thus far in 2018, we want to make sure to provide nursing professionals with the latest information as it becomes available.  According to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN), there are currently 29 states participating in the eNLC.  One of the most frequently asked questions we receive is from nurses who are questioning what steps they have to take to acquire a multi-state nursing license.  Hopefully, we can clear up any confusion now.

  1. Your first step in the licensing process is to determine your current states licensing requirements.  To see the current list of states participating in the eNLC, visit the NCSBN eNLC Implementation page here. The next step in the process will vary depending upon whether or not your state of primary residence is participating in the compact.
  2. If you reside in and hold a valid nursing license in a participating compact state, there is little more that you need to do.  As per the NCSBN, any nurse with an active compact license can practice in other compact states without any additional fees or licensing procedures.

NOTE: If you change your primary residence to another compact state, you have to apply for licensure by endorsement from your new state board of nursing within 30 days. Secondly, if you move from a compact state to a non-compact state, you have to apply for licensure from the new state and also inform the former (compact) state that you are no longer a resident and now have a single-state license.

  1. If your permanent residence is in a non-compact state and you are going to practice in a compact state, you are required to apply for licensure from the new state’s board of nursing.  This can be done by endorsement.  When you are practicing between two non-compact states, you are required to apply for a license with the new state board of nursing.
  2. One key to the licensure process when multiple states are involved is to start the process early!  When have you ever know a governmental or regulatory process to go quickly and efficiently?  The short answer is never.  Don’t procrastinate when you are considering working in a different state for a travel assignment.  Determine what your licensing requirements are going to be as soon as you have an idea of where the assignment is going to be and get the process started.
  3. Ask your recruiter for help whenever you come across a licensing issue that you are confused about or unsure of.  Supplemental Health Care has an experienced team of recruitment professionals who have navigated almost any licensing question that could come along whether it is in a compact state or non-compact state. Their focus is on helping you prepare for your upcoming assignment and want you to be successful and comfortable in doing it.

We want to hear about your licensing questions.  Have you come across any situations that you are unsure of or have you ever had to resolve any licensing issues that were out of the ordinary?  Help your colleagues who may be facing something similar by posting in the comment section below or drop us a line on our Facebook page.

Travel Assignment