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January 25th is IV Nurse Day

Since 1980, every January 25th is the day set aside to recognize infusion nurse professionals around the world.  The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) is encouraging healthcare professionals worldwide to celebrate the meaningful patient care that is being pro
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Since 1980, every January 25th is the day set aside to recognize infusion nurse professionals around the world.  The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) is encouraging healthcare professionals worldwide to celebrate the meaningful patient care that is being provided by dedicated IV Nurses.

The theme for IV Nurses Day 2018 is “It’s About Us.  It’s About Infusion.”  Also known as Infusion Nurses, these registered nurses are specially trained to administer medications and fluids intravenously. IV Nurses monitor their patients and manage the tubing and arterial catheters that are providing fluids.  Another important responsibility for IV Nurses is to maintain awareness about potential drug complications or interactions.

IV Nurses work in a variety of care settings, not just in hospitals.  They are also providing care in long-term care centers, community clinics, and can work directly in patient’s homes through home health agencies. To pursue an Infusion Certification, candidates must earn their Nursing Diploma, ASN, or BSN and pass a National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX).  Then after working a minimum of 1,600 hours in an infusion-related field, nurses can take a Certified Registered Nurse Infusion Exam.  Upon passing the exam, nurses will earn a Certified Registered Infusion Nurse (CRNI) credential.

As with nursing jobs in general, the outlook for IV Nurses is very positive.  Job opportunities continue to rise across the country making it a specialty worth considering for any nurse looking to specialize.  Nurses who enjoy the patient-facing aspect of care will flourish as an IV Nurse, if you are very organized and structured in your approach.  There is also an element of independence when you are an Infusion Nurse as you are working with your specific set of patients and routines without having to adjust to other situations that are happening around you.

If you are already an IV Nurse, congratulations and thank you! Today is your day, and we would love to see you celebrating IV Nurse Day 2018.  Bring a cake to work and have a party!  The INS wants to share in your IV Nurse Day celebrations.  Snap some photos of the fun and send them to ins@ins1.org.

We want to hear from you.  Why did you choose to become an IV Nurse?  Or, let us know if you are considering taking steps to become a CRNI?  Share your story in the comment section below or drop us a note on our Facebook page.

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